Archive | May, 2012

Fair Price Shop: Making Food More Affordable for Workers

We visited the Fair Price Shop, which allows workers to buy basic food products at a wholesale price. Combining their collective power with the Fair Trade Premium they receive, workers can save on food, and do more with their earnings.

Senda Athletics founder Santiago Halty continues recounting his 10 day journey in Sialkot, Pakistan, where he visited the factory where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. This is his fourth blog post from his trip. 

View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]  | View the third post [+] | View the fourth post [+] View the fifth post [+] 

On my recent trip to Pakistan, I visited the Fair Price Shop. Located in the factory, the Fair Price Shop is run and used by the workers to purchase food staples, such as rice, cooking oil, flour, and tea, at a wholesale price.

The Fair Price Shop is run by the Joint Body, a group of workers that decides how the Fair Trade premiums that Senda pays is used to better their community (read Santiago’s blog better explaining the Joint Body here).

The ultimate goal of the Fair Price Shop is to provide accessible, affordable, and quality food to workers at a price they can afford. The workers spend a lot of their income on food staples, and the Joint Body wants them to be able to stretch their purchasing power.

The Fair Trade Shop is extremely accessible to the workers. First, they create a list of items that they want to purchase for the week for them and their families, and bring it with them to work. After work, they go to the Fair Price Shop and purchase the items on their list.

During my time in Pakistan, I asked the workers about what they thought of the Fair Price Shop. One suggestion that was shared by several workers was the need for affordable medicine. We are excited to announce that in about two to three months, the Joint Body will set up Fair Price Medicine Shop , which will make available affordable medication to our factory workers.

We believe that happier people create better products, so we will continue to support our workers with help from the Fair Price Shop and the Joint Body.

Hope you will join us, next time you need a quality soccer ball!

Santiago

Senda, All the Way in Alaska

A Senda RIO Futsal ball in Alaska!

Senda takes pride in having some of the best soccer supporters out there: people who love the game unconditionally!

In this guest blog post from Patrick Solana Walkinshaw, living in Dillingham, Alaska, he tells us how he fought to keep the game alive in the coldest of circumstances:

Moving to rural Alaska has been a family adventure. We wanted to get away from the hectic city lifestyle, be in nature, and get to know our community. We have made some sacrifices to live here, but the one thing we haven’t been willing to give up is playing soccer. Given that the only grass in the community is the softball field and a small muddy patch near a playground, I decided to try my luck indoors. After a year of assuring school maintenance officials that soccer can be played indoors without balls breaking down walls and windows, in the fall of 2011, I started a futsal programs for ages 12 and up. Given that there are no sporting good stores in my community, I went online in search of a futsal I could rely on. I was pleased to see that there was a Fair Trade option through Senda because I support an economic system that treats our global community with respect and fairness. I am now positively connected through my little community in Alaska, to a small business in California, and to factory workers overseas. Thanks Senda!

Patrick Solana Walkinshaw

Dillingham, ALASKA

Patrick, a lover of soccer and a supporter of Senda, playing in Alaska.

Meet Hassan, from the Packing Department

Senda Athletics Founder Santiago Halty continues his 10 day journey in Sialkot, Pakistan visiting the factory where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. This is his third blog post from his trip. 

View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]  | View the third post [+] | View the fourth post [+] View the fifth post [+] 

This week I learned a great deal about the process of making a Senda Fair Trade soccer ball. I saw all the dedication and attention to detail behind each product. Once our soccer balls have been made, they are inspected at quality control, washed, deflated and packed to be sent to our warehouse in Oakland, California.

Before coming to visit, we received pictures of people involved in making and sending us the balls. One of those pictures was of the packing department, and it included a smiley person who captured our attention,

Hassan.

Meeting Hassan was a bit like meeting someone I already knew as he is famous at Senda’s office. I was even asked by our PR manager Alessandro to look for him when I arrived at the factory and get a picture together.

I am bringing some photos of Hassan signed by himself back home, one for Alessandro, one for me, and one for our office!

I had a chance to meet and talk with Hassan, and learned about his life and hopes for the future.

Soon we will be making videos with the stories of Hassan and other people behind Senda’s soccer balls, so that you can see first hand the importance of supporting Fair Trade, and the dedication of the people working to get you the best soccer ball possible.

Thanks for joining us in changing the world through soccer, and see you on the field!

Santiago

The Human Connection: Fair Trade Producers and Consumers

With the help of my host in Pakistan, Mr. Ehsan, I talked to the women workers about the different people who use Senda soccer balls.

Senda Athletics Founder Santiago Halty continues his 10 day journey in Sialkot, Pakistan visiting the place where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. This is his second blog post from his trip. View the first post here.

View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]  | View the third post [+] | View the fourth post [+] View the fifth post [+] 

What a great day I had at the Fair Trade factory today! I can already recognize the faces of some of the people working in the different areas of Senda’s soccer ball production. People are beginning to feel comfortable seeing a foreigner around and simply chatting with me.

When I was in Berkeley preparing for my trip to visit our Fair Trade soccer ball producers, I wanted to come with something to give to the workers, and help break the ice. Bringing a physical gift for everyone was out of the question, as I did not have enough room in my luggage to do so! I started to ask for advice to people close to me and Senda.

My mother, who has been an amazing supporter of Senda from day one, always talks about Fair Trade as a way to bring dignity and pride to people through their work.

Following her advice, my team and I worked hard on making a video where players who purchased a Senda product directly thank the workers for the quality soccer balls they produce.

I was able to show that video to the workers today and it was a fantastic feeling to see their smiles and expressions when they saw people of all ages enjoying the Senda soccer balls.

Senda’s rock-star videographer intern (you know it’s you Abby!), made the video just in time for my trip. She included the word “Shukriya”, which means thank you in Urdu.

Check it out below.

Everyone should take pride in their work and feel they are making a difference. Often times, workers at factories are seen simply as labor inputs. It is tough for them to take pride in their work or find out what happens with the product after it has shipped from the factory.

As part of my trip to Pakistan, I want to start changing that paradigm, one person at a time.

As simple as it might seem, showing our factory workers the fruit of their labor can put a smile on their face. This simple act makes a big impact in how that person perceives their work.

A soccer ball brings so much happiness to those who use it. So, we wanted to make sure some of that joy went back to its source – the makers of the ball.

We know its a small gesture, but we are convinced that its well worth it.

Workers from the packing department got a kick out of hearing players of all ages saying “Thank You” in their language.

 

Senda Arrives in Pakistan to Hear Stories Behind Fair Trade

Senda Fair Trade Soccer Balls in Pakistan

After a long 14 hour journey and a bit of jetlag, I arrived in the city of Sialkot, Pakistan to visit the place where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. I couldn’t be more excited to be here and have the opportunity to meet the people behind each Senda soccer ball. I will be staying here for 10 days, and will be uploading posts and stories of my experience.

I am lucky to have a great host, Ehsan, who picked me up at the airport this morning. He has been educating me on local culture and also helps me communicate with workers.

My first impression was that people take a great amount of pride in their work, and that they enjoy meeting someone who came from so far away to see them.

A smile and kindness can do wonders and are universal communication tools that can span language barriers. I am looking forward to visiting the homes of some of the workers, learning how to stitch a ball from them, and hearing personal stories of how people’s lives have been improved thanks to Fair Trade.

Tomorrow, I will learn more about the entire production process of a Senda ball. We will look at a quality control process that guarantees Senda’s soccer balls match or surpass the quality of competitors across the board.

Remember, there is a face behind every Senda soccer ball you purchase. Help us support the factory workers and their right to make a fair wage. 

Senda stitchers in Pakistan