Archive | July, 2014

Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Evan

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

In this second edition of our Staff Profile, we talked to Evan, our Social Media Marketing and Copywriting Intern.

 

Evan Profile final

Evan — The World Cup for me is about much more than the game being played on the pitch. The tournament represents both the harmony and the disunity of our current world. For a couple months every four years, thirty-two nations put aside their squabbles and come together to compete in the same tournament. Teams and players from many different nations and from diverse backgrounds temporarily forget cultural differences and play by the same rules and regulations. All teams at the World Cup start off with equal standing and strive to attain the same goal — the FIFA World Cup Trophy.

But once the tournament starts, it’s a contest between nations not just to demonstrate dominance on the pitch, but also to assert their power on the world stage. Teams stop at nothing to win games and claim the ultimate prize. The World Cup Trophy represents so much more than just soccer excellence. It is a tangible marker of your country’s economic power and standing in global politics. The World Cup allows us to play out our nationalistic rivalries in a healthy sporting environment. Soccer is both the great unifier and the great divider.

Oh yeah, one more thing, GO USA!!

Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Aliénor

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

To start off our Staff Profile, we talked to Aliénor, our Outreach & Community Manager who hails from France.

Aliénor — The World Cup has been a great time and brought many good memories to our Senda offices. It has been very exciting for us to watch the games and expose our supporters to the local Brazilian perspectives. Whenever a game was on, we’d always have one eye on our work and the other on the scoreline. We didn’t let it harm our productivity…(not too much, anyway!)

Even though I’m French, I’m glad that Germany made it to the final. Not just because of their great team spirit and collective play, but also because I predicted them in my World Cup bracket to make the finals! And as they beat France earlier in the tournament, Germany winning makes France look stronger.

It’s a shame that the Brazilians had to get knocked out of the tournament like that. The festa in Brazil would’ve been a lot more enjoyable, but oh well, it was not meant to be. If this loss inspires Brazilians to continue to speak out against the government and fight for better infrastructure and social services, then perhaps it will be worth it in the end.

 

 

#BeyondtheCup: Brazilians Share their Thoughts on the World Cup, Part 2

Welcome to the second installment of Senda’s #BeyondtheCup series, where we give you an inside look at the World Cup in Brazil. Here, we will bring you the stories of many diverse individuals, each one with their own unique perspective on life, soccer, and the Cup. In our conversations with the local brasileiros, we seek answers to this simple question — “What does the World Cup mean to you?”

Senda’s 4th #BeyondTheCup story comes from Adriana, a waitress from San Pablo.

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Senda’s 5th #BeyondTheCup story is told by Nuno Arcanjo, a musician who hails from Belo Horizonte.

Nuno

Senda Athletics’ 6th #BeyondTheCup story is from Gabriel Almeida, an Office Manager who comes from Belo Horizonte.

Gabriel

This story is part of a month-long photography series meant to share with the world the native Brazilians’ views on the 2014 FIFA World Cup. But don’t think that their opinions are the only ones that matter! We want to hear from you as well! Let us know what you think of the World Cup so far on our Facebook page or on your social media outlets, using #BeyondTheCup.

#BeyondtheCup: Flashmob in Rio to support Soccer for Social Change

Yesterday, Senda Athletics participated in a flashmob in Rio to support NGOs working with blind, disabled, and at-risk individuals. The event, “Soccer for Social Change: Beyond the World Cup,” showcased soccer’s power to change lives.

The goal of the 10-minute long flashmob was to raise awareness about the crucial work of grassroots organizations and to encourage the public to leave the sidelines and help support the growing movement that uses soccer for social change.

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Accompanied by traditional Brazilian music, players from each organization performed a 2 minute skit featuring their unique take on soccer. As Brazilians rarely pass up on the opportunity to dance and let go, the audience was inspired to join the last several minutes of the flashmob. Afterwards, they were told more about the work of each organization and how to support their work.

Next, the audience got the chance to see what it’s like to play soccer in a power wheelchair. Another new experience for the spectators was completing (or at least attempting) soccer drills using blindfolds. These activities gave the crowd even more respect for those individuals who have to overcome physical challenges to play soccer.

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The flashmob could never have been the success that it was without the help of our fantastic friends and supporters. We at Senda would like to extend a special thank you to Urece Sports and Culture for the Blind, Rio de Janeiro Power Soccer Clube, @VisãodoFuturo, streetfootballworld and streetfootballworld Brasil.

We hope that our flashmob has inspired you to organize your own or to develop other creative ways of demonstrating soccer’s power to improve communities. By starting a flashmob, you will not only get to spread awareness about groups that use soccer for positive social change, but also have a ton of fun in the process!

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Senda Athletics’ Founder on BBC World News story

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Check out the BBC World News story that was published today about Senda Athletics’s founder Santiago.

Besides talking about his dreams of attending a World Cup since being a child, he was able to share Senda’s story and its vision to change the #Futbol industry!

Take a look and help us spread the word!

#BeyondtheCup: Brazilians Share their Thoughts on the World Cup

Welcome to Senda’s Beyond the Cup series, where we will give you an inside look at the World Cup in Brazil. Throughout the tournament, we will bring you the stories of 30 diverse individuals, each one with their own unique perspective on life, soccer, and the Cup. In our conversations with the local brasileiros, we seek answers to this simple question — “What does the World Cup mean to you?”

To start off our Beyond the Cup series, we sat down with Lara, a high school student who is not afraid to voice her opinions.

Rio, World Cup, Lara, Brazil

Lara, speaks her mind on the World Cup

 

For the second installment of our Beyond the Cup series, we talked with Railson, a beach vendor who sells coconut water. Although we met him in the Flamengo neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, he is not a carioca (Rio native). Railson hails from Maranhão, a state in the northeast of Brazil.

Railson, World Cup, Rio, Brazil

Railson, giving us his take on the Cup

Senda Athletics’ third Beyond the Cup story comes from Kazê Artist, a Power Soccer Player from Rio de Janeiro.

Kaze, Rio, Brazil, World Cup

Kaze, sharing his view on the World Cup

These stories are part of a month-long photography series meant to share with the world the native Brazilians’ views on the 2014 FIFA World Cup. But don’t think that their opinions are the only ones that matter! We want to hear from you as well! Let us know what you think of the World Cup so far on our Facebook page or on your social media outlets, using #BeyondTheCup.