Blog

More from the Muchnick Tournament

Read more about Senda meeting some of England’s best soccer players at the Adam Muchnick Soccer Camp at Newport Beach, CA. This is the final part. View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]

Check out the special guest who showed up at the Adam Muchnick International Soccer Camp! Former Chelsea and current Shanghai Shenhua forward Didier Drogba (above) played with a Senda Rapido Premier Ball. It also comes in a Mini Ball version!

Also, watch the video below to see professional players from England, such as Shaun Wright-Phillips (Queens Park Rangers), Ashley Cole (Chelsea), Zat Knight (Bolton Wanderers), and Victor Anichebe (Everton), playing with a Senda Valor Training Ball.

1 Comment

Mike’s Impressions from the Muchnick Tournament

Todd Dunivant (LA Galaxy) at the Muchnick Tournament

This is a guest post from our Director of Business Development and Marketing, Mike, who attended the Muchnick Tournament (you can read the first post here). He explains some of his impressions of the tournament:

Hi blog world! As an official sponsor of the Adam Muchnick International Soccer Camp, Senda sent me back to my hometown of Newport Beach, CA. I got to help activate the Senda brand, as well as be an extra set of hands for the camp directors. I also had the help of my “trusty steed,” my brother Brian, who plays outside back for UC Davis.

Aside from the flash of meeting some of the best soccer players in the world, I really enjoyed getting to know Todd Dunivant and Gwendolyn Oxenham. Dunivant is the starting outside back for the LA Galaxy and the MLS 11 team. He spoke with the campers and participated in a Q&A (most questions were about his famous teammates Landon Donovan and David Beckham). He also talked at length with Brian about coming up through the ranks and despite being under-appreciated (he has never been selected to the U.S. National team), he remained optimistic. His positivity really impressed me.

Todd Dunivant (LA Galaxy) and Brian

Oxenham is the star of the independent film Pelada. It is a very cool movie/documentary that follows Gwendolyn and her now husband Luke as they play pick up soccer games (pelada in Portuguese) around the world. Brian and I were lucky enough to play in a pick up game with her which was a very cool experience. She recently released the book she was writing while shooting the film, and she continues to play in peladas every week.

In general, it was a very fun week where we got to meet many fascinating people, help the local and international community, and gain some exposure for Senda! I am already looking forward to next year!

Leave a comment

Senda Sees International Players at SoCal Tournament

Brian & Mike (Senda) with Steven Ireland (Aston Villa), Victor Anichebe (Everton), Shaun Wright-Phillips (Queens Park Rangers), Zat Knight (Bolton Wanderers), & Ashley Cole (Chelsea)

Senda sponsored the Adam Muchnick International Soccer Camp held a few weeks ago in Newport Beach, CA. For four days, children between the ages of 5-16 got to play their favorite sport– and interact with some famous players. Senda was also able to get up close and personal with a variety of English Premier League and Championship stars including Shaun Wright-Phillips (Queens Park Rangers), Ashley Cole (Chelsea), Steven Ireland (Aston Villa), Zat Night (Bolton), Victor Anichebe (Everton),  and Dexter Blackstock (Nottingham Forest). The camp gave a portion of its proceeds to the Children’s Foundation in Guatemala, where Shaun Wright-Phillips has been an ambassador since 2007.

The camp organizer, Adam Muchnick, is a former lawyer turned professional soccer agent. Many of the coaches at the tournament were either professional players, club coaches, or scouts.

Senda was represented at the tournament by Director of Business Development and Marketing Mike, and his brother, Brian. Mike explained his experience at the tournament, “All of the players were really nice. They were well-spoken and seemed to genuinely care about giving back to the community.  They even kicked around a Senda Valor with some of the campers, and many of them respected the Fair Trade aspect. Shaun Wright-Phillips even came up to me and said ‘Best of luck with the new company.  I hope it works out.’”

Some of Mike’s highlights during the tournament include Zat Knight being in denial of how tall he really is, Ashley Cole missing a penalty kick, the players unanimously agreeing that Lionel Messi is the best player in the world, and Shaun Wright-Phillips talking about overcoming adversity to succeed. Numerous scouts passed on him because he was short, but he did not let that stop him.

This was the first year that Muchnick hosted the tournament. Due to its success, another camp next year is likely. Senda hopes to be there once again!

Ashley Cole (Chelsea) with Mike and Brian

Victor Anichebe (Everton) with Mike & Brian

Dexter Blackstock (Nottingham Forest), Victor Anichebe (Evertone), Shaun Wright-Phillips (Queens Park Rangers), Zat Knight (Bolton Wanderers), & Ashley Cole (Chelsea)

Zat Knight (Bolton Wanderers) with Mike

 

Leave a comment

First Footgolf Tournament Kicks Off with Senda as the Official Ball

Here at Senda, we are happy to announce our latest partnership with the American FootGolf League (AFGL)! Footgolf is a newly created sport, and it is poised to be the U.S.’s latest craze since it combines two popular sports, soccer and golf, together.

Footgolf was created in 2009 in the Netherlands, and its popularity has expanded to Belgium, Argentina, Mexico, and Italy, just to name a few. Footgolf is traditionally played on golf courses, where the goal is to get the soccer ball in the 21 inch hole in as few kicks as possible (yes there is a dress code). In June of 2012, the first Footgolf World Cup was held in Hungary. New footgolf leagues are popping up everywhere around the country from Miami, the San Francisco Bay Area, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

American FootGolf League: Season 2012 Opening Tournament at Wisconsin Dells, July 22, 2012

The first footgolf tournament in the U.S. will be held on July 22, 2012 in Wisconsin Dells at the Cold Water Canyon Golf Course at the Chula Vista Resort. The Chula Vista course will be the first AFGL approved course in the United States. They hope to have a total of twelve by the end of the year, and twenty-four approved courses by the end of 2013.

Senda is providing the tournament’s official ball, where 30 of the 100 custom made balls will be present. Unlike traditional soccer balls, Senda developed dimples for the balls, much like the surface of a golf ball. The balls were also made to have a better flight– perfect for long shots. Senda will continue to be the official ball for the American FootGolf League for the next couple of years.

Click here to check out more photos of the official ball here!

 

Leave a comment

Senda Makes the Official Ball for the Street Soccer USA National Cup

We’re more than happy to announce that Senda has made the official ball for Street Soccer USA’s 2012 NYC Cup. 25 specially-designed versions of the Rio Futsal will make the journey to New York City, and each Street Soccer USA City will go back home with one of them (you can purchase your own mini-ball version at the Cup where a portion of the proceeds goes back to Street Soccer USA).

Street Soccer USA teaches homeless people life skills through sport, and last year’s Cup, held in Washington, D.C. was a major success. More than 200 players and coaches participated. Most of them were homeless and former participants in Street Soccer USA. A lot of them went to D.C. as coaches, players, or supporters.

For Street Soccer USA tournaments, sportsmanship counts for a lot. Last year’s Cup introduced the use of green cards. When teams were even on points after group play, the green cards served as the tie-breaker. Handed out by referees after a match, they are awarded to players that show positive sportsmanship during a game.

This year, the Cup will be bigger than ever, with the final games being played at Times Square. Teams will be co-ed, and will come together from all over the nation to play soccer and fight against homelessness.

Sign up here to get involved in either of these three ways:

  • PLAY - Sign your team up to play in either the Open Cup or the Corporate Cup.
  • VOLUNTEER - Sign up to help out with NYC Cup weekend activities.
  • SPONSOR -  Make a donation to help support Street Soccer USA players and teams.

OR if you’re in the New York City area, come out and support the nation’s premier sport for social change event by cheering on:

July 26-27, 8am-8pm at Broome and Chrystie Street on the Lower East Side

July 29, 8am-4pm at Times Square 46th Street Plaza

Click here to read more about Senda’s partnership with the Bay Area branch of Street Soccer USA.

Read our previous blog post with Street Soccer USA coach, Antoine Lagarde, here.

 

Leave a comment

Coach Profile: Dan and Sara (HappyFeet: Des Moines, Iowa)

Coach Daniel

For Senda’s second coach profile, we interviewed two coaches over at HappyFeet in Des Moines, Iowa. Daniel and Sara both answered our questions about coaching young children, fair trade, and their most memorable moments.

How is it like to coach soccer to 2-5 year olds?

Sara: This is the most amazing job I have ever had! Before becoming the director, I was a coach for about a year (and am currently still coaching). I work with training the new coaches to help them understand how to explain soccer to such young children! This age group is so much fun, it’s amazing to see how quickly they learn and how much fun they have with our curriculum.

Daniel:  Coaching this age group is one of the most enjoyable things I have ever done.  Just watching them grow as little soccer players is amazing.  They soak up everything that you teach them and it is amazing watching them try the things that we teach them.  They want to learn this game and they get so excited every week for HappyFeet to visit their school.  I love seeing that excitement and that is what drives me every day.

What aspects of the game do you try to emphasize at such a young age?

Sara: The things we try to emphasize is just being comfortable with a soccer ball. Most kids are so used to picking up any type of ball and throwing it, so learning to use their feet is a very new skill. We teach skills such as pull backs, step overs, and pendulums. Our goal is for them to get the motion down and as they grow older they will start to understand what the move is used for and have more confidence during a real game to do as many moves as possible!

What is HappyFeet’s coaching philosophy? What do you hope to accomplish?

Sara: Our coaching philosophy is very child centered. We aren’t all about the “winners” or the amazing players, we understand that every child has a different set of skills and everyone can’t be like Cristiano Ronaldo! What we hope to accomplish is that every child has confidence in themselves. We want them to grow up knowing to not be afraid to go out of their comfort zone and try something different, in soccer and in life.

What was the most memorable HappyFeet moment you had during a lesson/game?

Daniel: I have two memorable moments. The first one was getting a group of two year olds that I’ve been working with for months to do step overs. Just watching their teacher’s jaws drop in amazement was awesome. One of the teachers came up to me later and told me how incredible it was watching them do this move because they couldn’t even tie their own shoes, walk in a straight line, etc. But when challenged they could do a step over, no problem.

The other memorable moment was this Spring in our first HappyFeet League.  I had a very young team (4 years old) that was eager to learn, but at the same time very timid with this new experience.  I had one child in particular that always wanted to score at least one goal a game, no matter what.  On the very last day he was starting to get upset because he hadn’t scored yet, so I told him that he had to win the ball in order to score a goal.  So what did he do?  He went down the field and stole the ball from the other team.  He was so excited that he just froze and couldn’t figure out what to do next.  I kept telling him to do a pull back to change direction and go the other way.  It took him about five seconds to unfreeze but when he did, he did the pull back move, changed directions away from the other team and ran down the field and scored.  He came right up to me with a huge smile yelling “I did it, I did it!  Did you see that?  I did it, I did it!”  As he gave me a high five, I had a tear in my eye and so did his parents on the sidelines.  This kid stepped up to the challenge, didn’t back down, and accomplished what he wanted to do.  That is what drives me and my coaches every day!  Watching these kids accomplish their dreams on the field and in the classrooms is one of the most amazing feelings the world.

How has the soccer scene evolved in Iowa over the last 10-15 years?

Sara:It has evolved like CRAZY. We have a huge soccer market here and I know when I was growing up it was still growing. It is still a growing market and I am excited to see how it will grow in the future.

HappyFeet Iowa's newest bobcat.

How do you think players aged 2-5 will respond to the concept of fair trade when you introduce your new Senda balls this coming season?

Sara: I don’t know if they will know! BUT we will let them know and explain the importance. I think a lot of them will really appreciate their new bobcats.

What piece of advice would you give to coaches that work with very young players?

Daniel:  Have fun and be yourself.  If you are always worrying about what these little kids are thinking about you then you will never be successful.  You have to have fun, be goofy, act crazy and just plain make them laugh and smile.  If you can do that then not only will you be having fun but the kids will too, and that is what matters the most.  If they are having fun and learning at the same time then you are doing your job.

If you’re in the Des Moines area, or just want to learn more about young children and soccer, visit HappyFeet’s website.

Coach Sara

 

Leave a comment

Fair Trade Joint Body Discusses New Community Projects

Attending the Joint Body meeting with the help of my host, Ehsan (left).

Senda Athletics founder Santiago Halty recounts his 10 day journey in Sialkot, Pakistan, where he visited the factory where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. This is his fifth blog post from his trip. 

View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]  | View the third post [+]View the fourth post [+] 

Before arriving in Sialkot, Pakistan, one of the activities I was looking forward to the most, was meeting our ball stitchers’ and workers’ Joint Body. As part of of its commitment to Fair Trade, Senda pays a Fair Trade Premium with every ball, which is used for community projects, like healthcare and education. The Joint Body is a group of workers who are democratically elected by their peers that discuss and decide how those Fair Trade premiums can be used to benefit their coworkers and community. The Joint Body is composed of eight workers, including three factory workers, three ball stitchers, and two people from management.

I was able to participate in a Joint Body meeting and listened to some of the ideas they had to improve community projects and create new ones. There were talks about bringing a doctor at the factory to do medical check-ups, as well as putting together an eye clinic.

In addition, my host Ehsan and I met with people from a microcredit bank, to learn from them about the most successful micro-finance projects, which could potentially be started by workers’ family members.

It is through these projects aimed at improving the lives of the people making Senda’s soccer balls that provide an opportunity to make a difference. We couldn’t do this without the support of coaches, players, and parents who choose Senda whenever they need soccer equipment.

We want to thank everybody who has supported us in the last two years, and invite everyone who loves soccer to join us!

Leave a comment

Guest Blog: Designed Good’s Katy and Her Favorite Soccer Memory

What's your favorite soccer memory? A pickup game in the park on a spring day? A beach soccer tournament at Santa Cruz?

In Senda’s second guest blog post Katy Gathright, co-founder at Designed Good, shared with us her thoughts and stories on the Beautiful Game, giving back, and her favorite soccer memory: a flash party.

People talk all the time about giving others access to resources. But the process of giving back to people should also be accessible. I think it makes more sense to build a world where the things we use are connected to the things we think and imagine.

Last month, one of my best friends and I were sitting in the local coffee shop in Williamstown on a sunny afternoon, surrounded by people talking and studying and ordering iced lattes. He turned to me and said we deserved to do something really fun. Happy to validate this escape from our normal hang out spot, I agreed. He suggested we grab a soccer ball and take his amp down to the fields called Poker Flats where there was an outdoor electrical outlet to plug it in. We headed the half mile down to the fields, texting everyone we knew on the way, and held a flash soccer party. That was one of the best afternoon hours of my spring.

We weren’t kicking around a Senda ball then, but now that I’ve started a conversation around their products, I think about Foster the People blaring across the Poker Flats field and how much fun it was to play outside with my friends. I love that Senda balls not only support and help others, but also give people a place and a context to feel their very best. It is with this frame of mind – that sunny afternoon kind of feeling – that terms like fair trade and social change take on real meaning.

That’s why we love Senda’s fair trade soccer balls at Designed Good. It’s not particularly mysterious why we’ve picked them out of the crowd: Their products are both supportive of communities and high-quality in their own right. Senda balls are actually made for people to play real, fun soccer, and the stories of the people they help are inspiring on a relatable level.

Katy Gathright is a co-founder at Designed Good, a website where members can discover and purchase awesome products with a socially-conscious edge. 
Want to keep up the conversation? Drop her a line at: Blog, Facebook, Twitter

Also check out Senda’s guest blog a Designed Good here.

Katy had a flash soccer party. What’s your favorite soccer memory? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Leave a comment

Coach Profile: Antoine (Street Soccer USA, Bay Area)

Antoine coaching his team.

Senda Athletics had the chance to interview Antoine about his connection to one of our non-profit partners, Street Soccer USA. Also check out the news story that CBS 5 San Francisco did about Street Soccer USA in the video below.

Name: Antoine Lagarde

Coach: Street Soccer USA, Bay Area, San Francisco

Nationality: France/USA

Age: 30

Occupation: SF Conservation Corps Teacher

Playing Position: Midfield

Soccer Heroes: Eric Cantona & Socrates

Motto: “Success is going from failure to failure with enthusiasm. My job as a coach is to motivate my players to always to always go hard.

So you coach a team of homeless and disadvantaged youth in San Francisco, what makes you the happiest when coaching a team like that?

Antoine: I am happy when my more advanced players patiently teach our beginners how to play. I am happiest when the positive attitude on our team inspires our players to go to college, find work, stop using drugs/alcohol, and get back on their feet!

What has been your best moment as a coach?

Antoine: My favorite moment was coaching the USA National team at the Homeless World Cup in Paris. We struggled at first, but became a family and finished the tourney at the best ranking the USA has ever had. It was a total team effort with everyone scoring at least 3 goals and leaving everything on the field. Out of our 7 players, 5 are currently coaching and using football to create positive transformations in the lives of their peers.

What was your most difficult moment on the soccer field as a player?

Antoine: My worst moment on the field wasn’t so much embarrassing as heartbreaking. I missed a couple of penalties against Kyrgyzstan when I represented the USA at the Milan Homeless World Cup which put our hopes of advancing to the next round in jeopardy.

What was your most triumphant moment on the soccer field as a player?

Antoine: Fortunately, I atoned for my mistakes by playing excellent defense against France in the next game and helping us upset them and qualify for the next round where I scored a couple of penalties in the quarterfinals. I was proud to be mentally tough by clearing my head and helping the team win.

What does supporting Fair Trade mean to you?

Antoine: It’s very important to me because as a teacher, I teach my students about globalization by showing them a soccer ball and asking them to describe it. We then explore who made the soccer ball, the possibility that it was a young child in Pakistan in poor working conditions, and talk about supporting efforts to pay workers a living wage through Fair Trade.

Leave a comment

Fair Price Shop: Making Food More Affordable for Workers

We visited the Fair Price Shop, which allows workers to buy basic food products at a wholesale price. Combining their collective power with the Fair Trade Premium they receive, workers can save on food, and do more with their earnings.

Senda Athletics founder Santiago Halty continues recounting his 10 day journey in Sialkot, Pakistan, where he visited the factory where Senda’s Fair Trade soccer balls are produced. This is his fourth blog post from his trip. 

View the first post [+] | View the second post [+]  | View the third post [+] | View the fourth post [+] View the fifth post [+] 

On my recent trip to Pakistan, I visited the Fair Price Shop. Located in the factory, the Fair Price Shop is run and used by the workers to purchase food staples, such as rice, cooking oil, flour, and tea, at a wholesale price.

The Fair Price Shop is run by the Joint Body, a group of workers that decides how the Fair Trade premiums that Senda pays is used to better their community (read Santiago’s blog better explaining the Joint Body here).

The ultimate goal of the Fair Price Shop is to provide accessible, affordable, and quality food to workers at a price they can afford. The workers spend a lot of their income on food staples, and the Joint Body wants them to be able to stretch their purchasing power.

The Fair Trade Shop is extremely accessible to the workers. First, they create a list of items that they want to purchase for the week for them and their families, and bring it with them to work. After work, they go to the Fair Price Shop and purchase the items on their list.

During my time in Pakistan, I asked the workers about what they thought of the Fair Price Shop. One suggestion that was shared by several workers was the need for affordable medicine. We are excited to announce that in about two to three months, the Joint Body will set up Fair Price Medicine Shop , which will make available affordable medication to our factory workers.

We believe that happier people create better products, so we will continue to support our workers with help from the Fair Price Shop and the Joint Body.

Hope you will join us, next time you need a quality soccer ball!

Santiago

2 Comments