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Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Raymond

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

In the fourth edition of our Staff Profile, we sat down with Raymond, our Operations Intern.

Raymond Final

Raymond — With the World Cup only happening every four years, it is really something spectacular. It is something completely different from just watching soccer clubs play against each other because you now have entire countries backing their team and supporting them. The sense of pride from everyone during the World Cup makes the game that much more dramatic and exciting. Soccer is able to unite people not only from the same country, but also from different ones. People from a diverse set of countries may come to appreciate the collective play of the Dutch or the passion of the Italians and support them without any concrete nationalistic ties. Fans of all nations can sympathize with each other because they know the feeling of their team winning or losing.

As I spent my first 18 years in New Zealand and China – neither of which usually qualify for the tournament – I often end up supporting a different team altogether at the World Cup. For this edition in Brazil, I chose Germany because of how fluidly and efficiently they play. The players had fantastic chemistry with each other. It was exciting to watch. They were like the San Antonio Spurs of soccer — each player stuck to his role for the benefit of the team.

Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Jeong

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

In this installment of our Staff Profile, we sat down with Jeong, our Director of Operations. He is a native of South Korea and a lifelong soccer supporter.

 

Jeong Staff Profile

Jeong — Of course, I support South Korea in international competitions. Even though the team didn’t play well this World Cup, they still represented the country honorably and played with integrity and grit.

I started following the World Cup in 1994 when it was held in the USA. The South Korean team was in a group with Spain, Bolivia, and Germany. They played very well and got the entire country excited about the World Cup and soccer in general. Despite their good performances, they didn’t make it through the first round. That didn’t matter too much though, because the game had already taken hold of the country’s imagination. The popularity of soccer in Korea skyrocketed after that year’s tournament. Since the World Cup in 1994, I have been following soccer and the World Cup very closely.

In 2002, the World Cup was held in South Korea and gave me many experiences and memories which I still cherish to this day. South Korea finished fourth in that tournament (admittedly with some questionable officiating decisions).

The only thing I enjoy more than being a soccer spectator is being a soccer player. I play 2 to 3 times per week. I have been able to make a lot of friends through soccer and it is one of the best ways for me to relieve my stress.

My love of sports, especially soccer, made it easy for me to decide to move to California to study Sport Management. And when the opportunity to work at Senda arose, I did not hesitate. Working at Senda allows me to use my love of soccer for the benefit of others.

Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Evan

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

In this second edition of our Staff Profile, we talked to Evan, our Social Media Marketing and Copywriting Intern.

 

Evan Profile final

Evan — The World Cup for me is about much more than the game being played on the pitch. The tournament represents both the harmony and the disunity of our current world. For a couple months every four years, thirty-two nations put aside their squabbles and come together to compete in the same tournament. Teams and players from many different nations and from diverse backgrounds temporarily forget cultural differences and play by the same rules and regulations. All teams at the World Cup start off with equal standing and strive to attain the same goal — the FIFA World Cup Trophy.

But once the tournament starts, it’s a contest between nations not just to demonstrate dominance on the pitch, but also to assert their power on the world stage. Teams stop at nothing to win games and claim the ultimate prize. The World Cup Trophy represents so much more than just soccer excellence. It is a tangible marker of your country’s economic power and standing in global politics. The World Cup allows us to play out our nationalistic rivalries in a healthy sporting environment. Soccer is both the great unifier and the great divider.

Oh yeah, one more thing, GO USA!!

Senda Staff Profiles: What the World Cup Means to Aliénor

Throughout this summer we’ve been bringing you an inside look at the World Cup from the perspective of local Brazilians. They have offered their views on soccer and daily life in Brazil, revealing deep insights into the national obsession with futebol.

But now, it’s time to hear from us! We thought we’d turn our focus inward and take a look at what our own employees here at Senda think of the World Cup. Even though the tournament is over (*sigh*), it’s never too late to discuss the Cup! We will be profiling our staff members and asking for their opinions about the world’s most beautiful game.

To start off our Staff Profile, we talked to Aliénor, our Outreach & Community Manager who hails from France.

Aliénor — The World Cup has been a great time and brought many good memories to our Senda offices. It has been very exciting for us to watch the games and expose our supporters to the local Brazilian perspectives. Whenever a game was on, we’d always have one eye on our work and the other on the scoreline. We didn’t let it harm our productivity…(not too much, anyway!)

Even though I’m French, I’m glad that Germany made it to the final. Not just because of their great team spirit and collective play, but also because I predicted them in my World Cup bracket to make the finals! And as they beat France earlier in the tournament, Germany winning makes France look stronger.

It’s a shame that the Brazilians had to get knocked out of the tournament like that. The festa in Brazil would’ve been a lot more enjoyable, but oh well, it was not meant to be. If this loss inspires Brazilians to continue to speak out against the government and fight for better infrastructure and social services, then perhaps it will be worth it in the end.

 

 

#BeyondtheCup: Brazilians Share their Thoughts on the World Cup, Part 2

Welcome to the second installment of Senda’s #BeyondtheCup series, where we give you an inside look at the World Cup in Brazil. Here, we will bring you the stories of many diverse individuals, each one with their own unique perspective on life, soccer, and the Cup. In our conversations with the local brasileiros, we seek answers to this simple question — “What does the World Cup mean to you?”

Senda’s 4th #BeyondTheCup story comes from Adriana, a waitress from San Pablo.

Adriana 4

Senda’s 5th #BeyondTheCup story is told by Nuno Arcanjo, a musician who hails from Belo Horizonte.

Nuno

Senda Athletics’ 6th #BeyondTheCup story is from Gabriel Almeida, an Office Manager who comes from Belo Horizonte.

Gabriel

This story is part of a month-long photography series meant to share with the world the native Brazilians’ views on the 2014 FIFA World Cup. But don’t think that their opinions are the only ones that matter! We want to hear from you as well! Let us know what you think of the World Cup so far on our Facebook page or on your social media outlets, using #BeyondTheCup.